Not in the Script

Not in the Script by Amy Finnegan
Published: 10-7-14 by Bloomsbury Childrens
Get the book: Amazon, The Book Depository

Millions of people witnessed Emma Taylor’s first kiss—a kiss that needed twelve takes and four camera angles to get right. After spending nearly all of her teen years performing on cue, Emma wonders if any part of her life is real anymore . . . particularly her relationships.

Jake Elliott’s face is on magazine ads around the world, but his lucrative modeling deals were a poor substitute for what he had to leave behind. Now acting is offering Jake everything he wants: close proximity to home; an opportunity to finally start school; and plenty of time with the smart and irresistible Emma Taylor . . . if she would just give him a chance.

When Jake takes Emma behind the scenes of his real life, she begins to see how genuine he is, but on-set relationships always end badly. Don’t they? Toss in Hollywood’s most notorious heart-throb and a resident diva who may or may not be as evil as she seems, and the production of Coyote Hills heats up in unexpected—and romantic—ways.

covergreen

Design – Amanda Bartlett       Rating – 3/5

I like the part illustrated/black + white, part photo/color combo of this cover. The movie set illustrations are detailed and interesting. I would really like the cover more if the guy wasn’t on it though. He just doesn’t look like he fits in the scene like the girl does. I do really like the way the title is laid out, as well as the two-tone effect with the shadow.

thought green

Not in the Script follows Emma and Jake as they deal with the various complications that come with their new TV show roles. This book deals with every aspect of their lives, from relationships to broken friendships and parents who don’t parent. Jake and Emma have a lot of things going on and the roles they play at work are just the beginning. Not in the Script’s characters are living on their own and paying their own way while they try to figure out their behind-the-scenes lives.

loved green

  • parents – While the parents of these rich teens are mostly absent, the book does lend a fair amount of time to unique, strange, and special relationships between famous children and their parents. Jake wants to be near his mom due to a medical condition, but needs to earn money to help her. Meanwhile, Emma’s mom is overbearing as a manager but underperforming as a mom, leaving Emma to figure out how to fire her but maintain their relationship. Who calls the shots when you make more cash than your parents? How do you forge a part business, part personal relationship?
  • tabloids – It’s interesting to see how Emma, Jake, and their friends deal with the gossip surrounding both their personal and professional lives. Rachel collects tabloids for the photos of Jake, Emma and her mom pay close attention to every Emma-related story, and Jake and his mom seem able to ignore it all. You really feel for these characters when it’s clear that an innocent night out with their friends can be spun into a juicy story in no time at all – and that their fans believe the stories. Emma’s 1st kiss was on camera and she’s spent time dodging paparazzi who have been selling lies about her love life ever since. These are young people whose every move is being closely watched for the sake of someone making a quick buck.
  • Jake + Emma – Both Jake and Emma are written in a way that makes them seem like average teenagers with extraordinary jobs. Jake likes the job but is in it temporarily so he can earn enough money to help his mom and pay for college. On the other hand, Emma loves acting and wants to keep it up, but struggles with being under constant public scrutiny. Each of them is used to faking emotions for a paycheck, but they let their guard down around each other. Jake and Emma are an adorable couple – both are sweet and thoughtful, and their conversations are so much fun to read. The book is narrated by both Jake and Emma, giving insight into their problems and feelings.

didn't love green

  • Rachel – Emma’s BFF has a big problem with jealousy, and I find it really annoying. Rachel has a chip on her shoulder because Emma is a successful actress and Rachel hasn’t found a way into the limelight. Emma truly does her best to get Rachel some acting jobs, while all Rachel does is whine about how Emma has everything. She refuses to see that Emma might have her own set of problems, because all Rachel sees is what she thinks Emma owes her.
  • predictability – There really aren’t many things wrong with Not in the Script, but I found myself wishing it was a bit less predictable. For instance, everyone’s parents are conveniently not on hand for one reason or another. The Hollywood bad boy is a jerk and the diva is arrogant, but our main characters have hearts of gold and not a flaw in sight. These teens are famous, so of course our couple bonds over how misunderstood they are due to tabloid gossip – but they understand each other because they’re in the same boat. 

quotes green

“That river behind us is called Rattlesnake Creek, so does that mean….?”
“Didn’t we already have this talk about Arizona?” I ask.
“Yes, but I didn’t expect snakes to be…you know, waiting outside my kitchen door. Like stray cats.”       – Emma + Jake   Loc. 1657/3877

“Well, it’s taken a while to figure that out,” I reply, “but your mom was the one who put me on the trail of a solid idea. And you were a lot of help too.”
Jake raises his brows. “Interesting. So…you’re setting up a support group for friends and family of chronically arrogant boys?”        – Emma + Jake    Loc. 1901

  4robots green

4 Robots

Acquired: NetGalley (ebook)

Advertisements

Talk to me!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s